Life In The Universe

The 2015 UA Science Lecture Series explores our Universe at molecular, biological, planetary and cosmic scales to ask 'What is life?' and how do we recognize it? Life as we know it produces complex order. Earth's many life forms are diverse and continually changing through birth, growth, and evolution. To understand life in the Universe we ask: What environments produce life and which attributes make something alive? How does life change? Is there life in our Solar System, or on one of countless exoplanets? Is there a connection between life on Earth and life elsewhere? Or are we alone?

Live Streaming, TV Broadcast and Podcast
Each lecture is streamed live by Arizona Public Media On Demand. Each lecture will also air on television after a one-week delay on Mondays, beginning February 2 at 8 PM. The broadcast will repeat: Tuesdays at 2 AM, Fridays at 1 PM, Sundays at 1 PM and again on Mondays at 12 AM and 2 PM.
Comcast Subscribers: Channel 76
Cox Subscribers: Channel 116

Arizona Public Media Radio Broadcast of Life in the Universe Panel Discussion
Arizona Public Media’s special “Life in the Universe” panel discussion moderated by College of Science Dean Joaquin Ruiz is available at azpm.org.

Jan 26 2015
What is Life?

Guy J. Consolmagno, SJ, Planetary Scientist, Vatican Observatory Research Group

Throughout history, our definition of 'life' reflects our assumptions about how the Universe works – and why we ask the question. The ways different human cultures, ancient and current, have talked about life provide some sense of how we have defined life, and illustrate the aspects of life that fascinate us. Many cultures used life as an analog to explain the movement of winds and currents, or the motions of the planets. Today we use those mechanical systems as analogs for life. Ultimately, we may not really know what life is until we have discovered more than one independent example of it on places other than Earth – we need many diverse examples before we can generalize. But without a definition of what we're looking for, and why we're looking, we may have a hard time recognizing life when we find it.

Feb 2 2015
Planet Formation and the Origin of Life

Dante S. Lauretta, Professor, Planetary Sciences/Lunar and Planetary Laboratory

It is generally accepted that planets or their satellites are required for life to originate and evolve. Thus, in order to understand the possible distribution of life in the Universe it is important to study planet formation and evolution. These processes are recorded in the chemistry and mineralogy of asteroids and comets, and the geology of ancient planetary surfaces in our Solar System. Evidence can also be seen in the many examples of ongoing planet formation in nearby regions of our galaxy. Finally, the variety of observable extra-solar planetary systems also provides insight into their origins and potential for life. These records will be discussed and compared to summarize our current understanding of planet formation and the accompanying processes that may lead to the origin of life throughout the Universe.

 

Feb 9 2015
Life on Earth: By Chance or By Law?

Brian J. Enquist, Professor, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Life on Earth is amazing and multifaceted. Ultimately all of life has descended from one common ancestor and has been guided by evolution by natural selection. On the one hand, the evolution of modern-day diversity and ecosystems may have been contingent on the initial chemical building blocks of life and the historical events that have characterized our planet over geologic time. On the other hand, there are numerous aspects of life pointing to regular and deterministic processes that shape the complexity and diversity of life. This talk will touch on those examples where the laws of chemistry and physics, in addition to evolutionary rules, have resulted in general properties of life. These properties ultimately determine how long we live, the diversity of life, the function and regulation of ecosystems and the biosphere, and how life will respond to climate change.
 

Feb 16 2015
Complexity and Evolvability: What Makes Life So Interesting?

Anna R. Dornhaus, Associate Professor, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Life is particularly fascinating in its ability to create complex and ever-changing forms out of simple building blocks. How does such complexity arise, and what are the conditions that allow never-ending evolution of new and more intricate forms of life? We now know that one of the main processes that allows this is that life consists of modules that interact with and feed back on one another. In the history of life on Earth, new levels of complexity have often arisen out of new types of such interactions, and continued evolution has been driven by life interacting with other life. We even find that man-made systems can develop a 'life' of their own when such feedback interactions among many modules occur. Life, it seems, is more about rules of interaction than special materials. We have only begun to understand the power of this algorithmic nature of life.

Feb 23 2015
Searching for Life in the Solar System

Timothy D. Swindle, Professor and Head, Planetary Sciences/Lunar and Planetary Laboratory
When Renaissance scholars figured out that the planets are, like Earth, orbiting the Sun, an immediate assumption was that they are inhabited worlds. In the last 50 years, spacecraft have determined that life on the surfaces of planets and moons in the Solar System is rare – if it exists at all. However, there are places where a search for life in the Solar System may still be fruitful. Although the current surface of Mars is a hostile environment, early Mars may have been much more clement to life. Jupiter's moon Europa is almost certainly barren on the surface, but has an 'ocean' of liquid water underneath a crust of ice, where some terrestrial organisms might be able to thrive. Finally, Saturn's moon Titan would not be suitable for life from Earth, but has rain and seas of liquid hydrocarbons, raising questions about whether life needs liquid water, or just needs some abundant liquid.

Mar 2 2015
Amazing Discoveries: A Billion Earth-like Worlds

Laird M. Close, Professor, Astronomy/Steward Observatory

One of the most fascinating developments in the last two decades is humankind's discovery of alien worlds orbiting stars near our Sun. Since the first such discovery in 1995 there has been a truly exponential growth in the detection of these new planets. Scientists have been puzzled and surprised by the diversity and extravagance of these new extra-solar systems. For example, we now know the most common type of planet is actually missing from our own Solar System. Recently, the space-based NASA Kepler Mission has discovered thousands of new worlds and suggests that one in five Sun-like stars may harbor an Earth-like planet. We will take a grand tour of some of these amazing new worlds, specifically noting where life might already exist, beyond our Solar System. The latest developments and difficulties of direct imaging for life on an exoplanet will be discussed.

Mar 9 2015
Intelligent Life Beyond Earth

Christopher D. Impey, University Distinguished Professor, Astronomy

One question rises above all others when it comes to our place in a vast and ancient Universe, 'Are we alone?' With a billion habitable locations in the Milky Way galaxy, and more than ten billion years for biological experiments to play out, a search for intelligent life beyond Earth is well-motivated. Unfortunately, the single example of life on Earth gives no clear indication of whether intelligence is an inevitable or an extremely rare consequence of biological evolution. The search for extraterrestrial intelligence, or SETI, is more appropriately called the search for extraterrestrial technology. So far, the search for intelligent aliens by their electromagnetic communication has met with half a century of stony silence. It's challenging to define life, and even more difficult to make general definitions of intelligence and technology. We'll look at the premises and assumptions involved in the search, the strategies used, and the profound consequences of making contact.

Lectures will be held at Centennial Hall on the campus of the University of Arizona.
View map to Centennial Hall

Parking

Parking is available in the Tyndall Avenue Garage.
View map to Tyndall Avenue Garage

Time and Cost

All lectures begin at 7 PM and are free to the public.

For More Information
Please call 520.621.4090

Course Overview
ECOL 596s is structured as a 1-unit graduate course with discussion, lecture and activities on the teaching of science in a high school classroom. The course is focused around an evening speaker series offered through the College of Science.
Teacher-participants meet once a week for three hours in the evening. In the first hour the class participates in an activity for teaching science in a high school science classroom or a presentation on a K-12 outreach opportunity at the UA. In the second hour the class attends the College of Science: Life in the Universe lecture. The third hour consists of discussion of the lecture and its application to the high school classroom. This course is structured for science teachers at the 6-12 grade level, but K-12 teachers at all levels are invited to participate. Pre-service teachers who are not yet certified may also take the course and earn undergraduate credit. Teachers earn 1 unit of graduate credit.

For More Information
John Pollard
(520) 621-8843
jpollard@email.arizona.edu

To Register
Please submit an email to John Pollard explaining (briefly) why you are interested in the class.
Enrollment is limited.

Tuition and Fees
100% tuition is paid by the College of Science through funding provided by Raytheon, Vantage West Credit Union and Ventana Medical Systems.

Location and Time
Class location will be announced. Classes run from 6:00-9:00 pm on eight evenings from January 20 to March 16. Parking is available in the Tyndall Avenue Garage.
View map to Tyndall Avenue Garage

Educator Forum
Tuesday, January 20
Introduction Class
Attendance is mandatory.

Monday, January 26
What is Life?
Guy J. Consolmagno, SJ, Planetary Scientist, Vatican Observatory Research Group

Monday, February 2
Planet Formation and the Origin of Life
Dante S. Lauretta, Professor, Planetary Sciences/Lunar and Planetary Laboratory

Monday, February 9
Life on Earth: By Chance or By Law?
Brian J. Enquist, Professor, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Monday, February 16
Complexity and Evolvability - What Makes Life So Interesting?
Anna R. Dornhaus, Associate Professor, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Monday, February 23
Searching for Life in the Solar System
Timothy D. Swindle, Professor and Head, Planetary Sciences/Lunar and Planetary Laboratory

Monday, March 2
Amazing Discoveries: A Billion Earth-like Worlds
Laird M. Close, Professor, Astronomy/Steward Observatory

Monday, March 9
Intelligent Life Beyond Earth
Christopher D. Impey, University Distinguished Professor, Astronomy/Steward Observatory

Monday, March 16
Final Class
Details to be announced.